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Recurring wasp problem shuts school for a third day in a week 

brenzett school






Pupils at Brenzett primary school has been sent home for the third day in a week after an infestation of wasps was seen nesting within some of the school buildings.
Despite efforts to have the wasps removed today Head teacher Hannah Peaston posted a notice on Facebook which stated: URGENT SCHOOL ANNOUNCEMENT Our wasps have returned and the school needs to close as soon as possible. Please collect your child if you are able or contact the school if you can’t so other arrangements can be made.”wasp-nest_1592591c
This follows reports that the wasps had built a nest in the toilets and the school had to get pest controllers in to get the nest removed.
However today a boy pupil was stung by a wasp and again the school was shut down.
The risk to children being stung can be serious, if a wasp feels that it’s nest is in danger they have an automatic response to try and protect it.
Whilst insect stings can cause unpleasant reactions around the site of the sting, most will be minor and will subside naturally. A severe local reaction may cause swelling with increasing pain over a period of hours, and in some cases, the entire limb that has been stung may swell up. Whilst not serious in itself, if swelling is near the face or neck it should be watched carefully in case it causes difficulty breathing.A few people may have a serious allergic reaction to wasp stings, leading to anaphylaxis. If a child has been stung and suffers breathing difficulties, a tight chest, a hoarse voice or a swollen tongue, these indicate a serious allergic reaction which may lead to anaphylaxis. Other signs of anaphylaxis are abdominal cramps, nausea, feelings of weakness or fear, dizziness and unconsciousness. Sometimes, people may develop hives and swelling over a part of their body distant to where the sting has occurred; while this is not anaphylaxis, this indicates a mild systemic reaction. In older children and adults (but not young children), such a reaction is considered to be a risk factor for a future severe reaction.
Parents had to make special arrangements to make sure that their children had somewhere to stay.
One parent told The Looker; “I have had to take another day of work, but at the end of the day, the school did the right thing, you cannot have wasps stinging the kids.”